7 Airplane Fun Facts

03 Nov

7 Airplane Fun Facts

Since everyone loves fun facts, here are a few interesting aviation facts.

The Wright Brothers

Airplane Fun Facts

Although aviation history and development can be credited to way before the Wright brothers, they are given credit for inventing and building the world’s first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human flight. This historical event happened on December 17, 1903.

Future Aircraft

Airplane Fun Facts

Airbus developers have their eyes set for the future, including some out of this world designs such as a see through plane where passengers can have an almost 360 degree view of what’s around them as they fly.

Most Expensive Private Jet

Airplane Fun Facts

A new Gulfstream G550 is priced 59.9 million US Dollars and is considered as the most expensive private jet to date. British billionaire Sir Philip Green is one of the proud owners of the G550.

World’s Fastest

Airplane Fun Facts

Official records point to the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird as the world’s fastest, manned jet aircraft. It can travel with a speed of 2,194 mph or 3,530 km/h. The record was set on July 28, 1976 near Beale Air Force Base, California, USA with Eldon W. Joersz and George T. Morgan Jr. as pilots.

Number of Flights Each Day

Airplane Fun Facts

Airports in the US alone cater to about 29,000 domestic and international flights each day (The Huffington Post). The cost and safety of aviation make it one of the most in-demand services of today.

Annual Revenue

The US airline industry makes approximately 170 billion US dollars in revenue each year. The industry is composed of 600 companies and the top 10, including American, Delta, and United Continental compose more than 75 percent of industry revenue.

Mercury and Airplanes

Under most circumstances it is prohibited to carry mercury on board a flight. This restriction is because a very small amount of mercury can cause serious damage to aluminum and most airplanes are made of aluminum.   Airplanes exposed to mercury are quarantined for further observation.

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