How to Become a Charter Pilot

If you dream of flying a G550, but don’t exactly know how to get your foot in the door, below are a few tips to help your charter pilot career take flight:

Charter Pilot 1. Build Flight Hours: It is important to log as many flight hours as possible.  But how many flight hours do you need?  Commercial airlines prefer a minimum of 1,500 hours of flight time.  However, most charter companies prefer about 3,000 flight hours.

2. Become a Flight Instructor: Flight instructors get paid to fly!  In addition, they get to log their flight time as PIC (Pilot-In-Command).  Since flying can be expensive, this is one of the most economical ways to accumulate flight time.  Furthermore, being an instructor is an excellent way to increase your knowledge and flight skills.

 

3. Choose a Flight Path: Commercial airlines generally do not require new pilots to have as many hours as charter companies.  Also, most charter companies prefer that new hires already have their Airline Transport Pilot (ATP) certificate – since this is not a requirement for commercial airlines, you might want to start with a commercial airline to increase your flight time and get your ATP.

Charter Pilot4. Know What Flight Departments are Looking For: In addition to building your flight hours, customer service experience is also extremely important.  Unlike commercial airline pilots, charter pilots work closely with their customers.  They are responsible for coordinating ground transportation, catering and other special requests their customers might have. Charter companies realize this and look for potential pilots who have a strong customer service background. Excellent customer service can turn a one-time customer into a customer for life.

Once you obtain your commercial pilot license with 250 hours of flight time, there are a few other paths to consider for building your flight hours:

  • Traffic Watch – You can gain 2-3 flight hours per day flying traffic watch.
  • Sky Diving Flights – Pilots can quickly earn hours flying a variety of aircraft for sky divers.  The more experience you have, the better chance of flying a turbine powered aircraft, such as a King Air, Beech 99, or a Cessna Caravan.
  • Towing – You can learn to become a tow pilot for sailplanes.
  • Scenic Flights – There are many scenic tour operators in the Western United States which provide opportunities for you to get paid to build your time.

Several of our pilots at Keystone Aviation have pursued their career opportunities through the above avenues.

So now that you know the steps to start building your pilot resume, get out there and fly!

DISCLAIMER: Statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, editors and publishers. While care has been taken in the compilation of this article to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Keystone Aviation will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within this article.

“There’s an APP for That” – Promoting Aviation Safety

We enjoy working in the fast paced general aviation industry.  While fun and exciting, this environment poses serious hazards that include, spinning propellers, jet engine blasts, and ground equipment moving every which way. The consequences of an accident could be devastating. Keystone Aviation is committed to promoting aviation safety.

How do we communicate best practices and promote behaviors that lead to a safer work environment, reduced damage, and injury claims? “There’s an App for that!”  No, we are not referring to the little icons on your electronic device that help you find the best restaurants or the latest movies near you.

When we use the term App, we are referring to Activities that Promote Prevention – “APP” What are we trying to prevent? …. Accidents! (which include employee injuries and damage to aircraft and equipment).

Often, all it takes is a little reminder to correct an unsafe behavior or to reinforce the training that leads to safe practices. Yes, you could say Wake Up! Pay Attention! Be Safe! But that only goes so far. We have found that if we identify the specific best practice or activity to increase awareness and promote it through visual reminders and training, people tend to retain and practice the activities until they become habits.

During our new hire orientation process, we introduce the program to the employees along with a list and explanation of previous Apps. We also use visual and video aids to better illustrate the message.

The APP Process

First, identify the best practice or the message you want to convey – most of the time it’s right in front of you. App messages can be found in:

  • Operating manuals
  • Industry standards
  • Results of hazards that have recently been identified through your Safety Management System (SMS)
  • Products of a near-miss or an incident that has occurred

Second, communicate the message in the form of posters, lanyard tags, post on the company intranet and use written instructions to blast the message to all employees in the company.

Lastly, monitor that the message is getting out and practiced. Observe the operation to measure the level of compliance. If we see an employee wearing a lanyard with an old App, we welcome the opportunity to educate and convey the new message. The App message becomes a month-long campaign.

APP Examples

  • “It’s Ok to Ask” – If you’re not 100% sure how to do it. ASK!
  • “No Running Vehicles” – Do Not leave any vehicle running while unattended.
  • “Red Tag It” – All employees are expected to Stop or Intervene when witnessing a potential hazard or unsafe situation.
  • “3’ Rule” – Maintain 3 feet of separation from other Aircraft or any Obstacle when parked.

So, the next time you hear, “There’s an app for that,” think about what you are doing to promote safety and reduce accidents in your organization and how you convey the message.

 

10 Busiest Airports in the World

Airports are among the busiest places in the world with people flying in and out all day, every day. “But which ones are the busiest among all these busy airports?”  We thought you’d never ask.

You’re in luck because we’ve just finished compiling a list of the 10 Busiest Airports in the World based on the total passenger traffic between January and September 2011.

10. Denver International Airport

Busiest Airports

With 39,953,117 total passengers, Denver International Airport in Denver, Colorado, USA is the 10th busiest airport on the planet today.

9. Frankfurt Airport

Taking the 9th spot is Frankfurt Airport in Frankfurt am Main, Hessen, Germany with 42,745,186 total passengers—that’s enough to fill several small countries!

Busiest Airports

8. Dallas Fort Worth International Airport

Busiest Airports

Beating Frankfurt Airport by less than a million passengers, we have Dallas Fort Worth International Airport in Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, USA with 43,468,057 passengers.

7. Tokyo International Airport

Busiest Airports

At 7th place, we have Tokyo International Airport in Ōta, Tokyo, Japan boasting 45,499,212 passengers over the last year. If that’s a Ramen shop in the photo, then it probably explains the over 45 million people who dropped by the airport last year.

6. Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport

Busiest Airports

Coming in at 6th place is Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport in Roissy-en-France, Île-de-France, France with 46,409,711 passengers. Now, with that many people in what’s considered to be the most romantic city in the world, it probably is the best place to look for love.

5. Los Angeles International Airport

If you thought it was a close fight between Frankfurt and Dallas Fort Worth for the number eight spot, then check out Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, USA. It took the 5th spot from Paris Charles De Gaulle by less than 500,000 passengers at 46,832,624.

4. O’Hare International Airport

Here’s another one from the US: The O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois. It takes the 4th spot with 50,204,670 passengers.

3. London Heathrow Airport

The 3rd busiest airport on Earth right now is London Heathrow in Hillingdon, Greater London, England, UK with 52,666,875 passengers.

2. Beijing Capital International Airport

We were quite sure that China will have an entry in this top 10 based on its population alone—and we were right. Taking the 2nd spot is Beijing Capital International Airport in Chaoyang, Beijing, China with its 57,950,779 passengers.

1. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

Finally, with a decisive lead, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta, Georgia, USA grabs the top spot with 69,730,632 passengers. That’s almost 30 million more than Denver International Airport!

And we’re done! That was the 10 Busiest Airports in the World. Now go and travel the world. Meet people. Experience new cultures. What could be more fun?

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World’s_busiest_airports_by_passenger_traffic

DISCLAIMER: Statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, editors and publishers. While care has been taken in the compilation of this article to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Keystone Aviation will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within this article.

Which aircraft is right for you?

So, you have thought about it long enough. You’re tired of taking three days to accomplish what could be done in one. Perhaps you have had enough of long lines and pat downs.  Maybe you’ve chartered or flown on a friend’s aircraft a time or two and realized the cost-benefit analysis makes sense.  Whatever your reason, you have decided it’s time to purchase your own aircraft. With that big decision made, now comes that task of deciding which aircraft is right for you.

As with most decisions in life, there are tradeoffs, and deciding which aircraft to purchase is no exception. The four main forces acting on an aircraft – thrust, lift, drag and gravity – are the cause of most aircraft acquisition tradeoffs. More thrust means higher speed, but more cost. More lift means shorter runways are accessible, but slower cruise speeds. Larger, heavier aircraft mean more cabin comfort and capability, but need more lift and thrust which, in turn, correlates to more cost.

Acquisition Budget. The most logical place to start is to set the acquisition budget. How much can I afford? It is important to remember that an aircraft is a tool to help facilitate the growth of your business and simplify your life. Letting ego creep into the budget decision can lead to acquiring more aircraft than needed, and can lead to a less than ideal ownership experience.

Operating Costs.   Just as important as how much can I afford to acquire the aircraft, is how much can I afford for direct operating cost of the aircraft? Typically, the older the airframe and engines, the higher the direct operating costs. This is due to more maintenance being required on the airframe, as well as the less efficient engines on older aircraft. As aircraft age, particularly beyond ten years, their values decline, but direct operating costs increase.   An extreme example of this is in the large cabin Gulfstream G-II market. While this 1970s vintage aircraft can be purchased for nearly give away prices of $400K and below, it will cost upwards of $7,000 per hour to operate.

Cabin. Generally, the larger the cabin, the higher the acquisition and operating costs. Some features of the aircraft cabin to consider:

  • Number of Seats.   The average passenger load for a business jet trip is approximately 2.5 people. Do you really need 12 seats for that annual trip to Hawaii? You can buy a lot of first class seats to the islands with the millions you will save in purchasing a midsize instead of a large cabin aircraft.
  • Cabin Size. Standup cabins are comfortable, but the bigger the cabin, the bigger the direct operating costs.
  • Lavatory. Some light aircraft have limited lavatory facilities with a curtain for a barrier or have no lav at all. How long do you plan on being in the air?
  • Baggage Volume. Storage space comes at a premium in an aircraft. Do you need the capability to load golf bags or skis? Some mid and light aircraft have baggage compartments loadable only from the interior, while others have larger exterior baggage space in the nose and tail of the aircraft.

 

Range.  Longer range capability means larger aircraft which means higher acquisition and operating costs. What are your common destinations? How many times per year do you travel to these destinations?   Do you need to go non-stop or will a stop along the way be acceptable? The 80/20 rule applies to range. Purchase an aircraft that will satisfy 80% of your needs – for all other occasions, you can make a fuel stop, charter a larger aircraft or book a first class ticket for the other 20% of your destinations.

Speed. One of the first questions many aircraft buyers will ask is “how fast does it go?” Most midsize and large cabin aircraft have cruise speeds that are not dramatically different. Light jets will have more variation in speed capabilities.   With the average business jet leg being 600 miles, the difference in speed from one model to the next often results in only a few minutes difference in travel time.

Service Ceiling. Most business jets are capable of flying as high or higher than the airlines enabling them to fly over most weather. If considering a turboprop aircraft, know they fly at lower altitudes which will occasionally result in the need to circumvent poor weather.

Runway Performance.  It is important to know the runway length at the airports you frequently use. Larger aircraft typically require more runway for takeoff and landing. The lighter the aircraft, the less runway needed. However, often less fuel is loaded on board in order to meet limited runway lengths, which results in fuel stops.

Payload. Most aircraft are not capable of filling the fuel tanks and filling the seats at the same time. While filling the tanks is not required on many flights, it is important to know the limitation of how much an aircraft can carry with full fuel.

One or Two Pilots. Most turboprop aircraft and many newer light jets are certified to be operated with a single pilot. Operating with a single pilot can reduce costs, increase payload capability and open up an extra seat for passengers. Having two pilots can add to the safety of operations due to the reduction in pilot flying work load, more eyes outside the cockpit and redundancy in case of health issues.

There is no one aircraft that will satisfy 100% of a buyer’s needs. Sorting through tradeoffs in performance, features and costs can be daunting, not to mention the complexities of the overall acquisition process.  Particularly for first time aircraft buyers, taking a conservative approach to aircraft selection and assessing real needs is wise. Getting professional guidance from an experienced aircraft broker is paramount to making the right aircraft selection, as well as to a successful acquisition.

By Michael Parker © December, 2011. Mr. Parker is vice president aircraft sales at Keystone Aviation, based in Salt Lake City, Utah and has brokered and professionally flown business aircraft for over 14 years.

DISCLAIMER: Statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, editors and publishers. While care has been taken in the compilation of this article to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Keystone Aviation will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within this article.

Winter Departures Procedures

Winter DepartureKeystone Aviation is spooling up for another winter wonderland at the Salt Lake City International Airport.

Hangar space in the winter is always in high demand. On an average night, Keystone Aviation has the capacity to hangar 35 transient aircraft. Even with over 400,000 square feet of hangar space, we find ourselves regretfully unable to accommodate everyone and sometimes have 50 additional aircraft requesting hangar.

The #1 Tip for Visiting Salt Lake City in the Winter:  Call Ahead!  Calling at least two weeks in advance makes it more likely that we will be able to fulfill your hangar request.  This is especially true around the Sundance Film Festival and the holidays (including President’s Day) when we recommend you call a month in advance if possible in order to reserve hangar space.

Winter DepartureIf you require de-icing, we typically have approximately 60 employees trained to airline standards and 9 well-maintained de-ice trucks hot and ready to go. For your convenience and safety, we also have air-to-ground radios installed in all of our de-ice trucks monitoring 128.85 so you can speak directly to the de-ice team.

Keystone Aviation would like to wish you safe travel during the upcoming winter season and we look forward to serving you!

Early Forms of Human Flight

From commercial aircraft to private jets, it is apparent that we are currently enjoying the progress made in aviation. However, before modern day aircraft came about, a number of inventions in the past attempted to make early forms of human flight possible. Let’s take a trip back in time and learn about the earlier forms of human flight.

Ornithopter – One of the world’s most famous artists, Leonardo da Vinci has had his share of interest in human flight with his famous drawings depicting bird-like machines intended for flying. One of his works, called the Ornithopter was never actually created, but influenced the design of the modern day helicopter.

Early Forms of Human FlightHot Air Balloons – The hot air balloon is the oldest form of successful human flight. It was invented by brothers Joseph Michel and Jacques Etienne Montgolfier who used farm animals as their first passengers. The first manned flight occurred on November 21, 1783.  The balloon drifted for about 5 miles with a wood fire used for power.

Airships – These aircraft made flight possible by using lighter than air gasses (hydrogen/helium) and were steered through the air with the help of rudders and propellers. In 1785, one of the pioneers of the airship, Jean-Pierre Blanchard successfully crossed the English Channel with a balloon equipped with flapping wings for propulsion, and a bird-like tail for steering.

Early Forms of Human Flight

Gliders – Developments made in aerodynamics brought about the birth of truly practical gliders in the 1800s. In 1891, German engineer Otto Lilienthal designed the first successful glider that could fly long distances.   Unfortunately, after more than 2,500 successful flights, Lilienthal was riding one of his inventions when a sudden, strong wind caused him to lose control and fall to the ground, resulting in his untimely demise.

DISCLAIMER: Statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, editors and publishers. While care has been taken in the compilation of this article to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Keystone Aviation will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within this article.

6 Airplane Fun Facts

6 Airplane Fun Facts

Since everyone loves fun facts, here are a few interesting aviation facts.

The Wright Brothers

Airplane Fun Facts

Although aviation history and development can be credited to way before the Wright brothers, they are given credit for inventing and building the world’s first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human flight. This historical event happened on December 17, 1903.

Future Aircraft

Airplane Fun Facts

Airbus developers have their eyes set for the future, including some out of this world designs such as a see through plane where passengers can have an almost 360 degree view of what’s around them as they fly.

Most Expensive Private Jet

Airplane Fun Facts

A new Gulfstream G550 is priced 59.9 million US Dollars and is considered as the most expensive private jet to date. British billionaire Sir Philip Green is one of the proud owners of the G550.

World’s Fastest

Airplane Fun Facts

Official records point to the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird as the world’s fastest, manned jet aircraft. It can travel with a speed of 2,194 mph or 3,530 km/h. The record was set on July 28, 1976 near Beale Air Force Base, California, USA with Eldon W. Joersz and George T. Morgan Jr. as pilots.

Number of Flights Each Day

Airplane Fun Facts

Airports in the US alone cater to about 29,000 domestic and international flights each day (The Huffington Post). The cost and safety of aviation make it one of the most in-demand services of today.

Mercury and Airplanes

Under most circumstances it is prohibited to carry mercury on board a flight. This restriction is because a very small amount of mercury can cause serious damage to aluminum and most airplanes are made of aluminum.   Airplanes exposed to mercury are quarantined for further observation.

DISCLAIMER: Statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, editors and publishers. While care has been taken in the compilation of this article to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Keystone Aviation will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within this article.

Private Aviation Gives Life

Private Aviation Gives Life

Somewhere in America, an organ was just delivered to a recipient through the use of private aviation. While some view private aircraft charter as a luxury for the rich and famous, many companies around the country offer their available fleet for life-saving organ transplant flights. The human body has a combination of over 100 organs and body parts that can be utilized as a transplant to give someone a second chance at life. Lungs, kidneys, and hearts however have a critically short time frame from the time the donor has given their organs to the time the transplant recipient can successfully accept an organ.
The pilots and crew members of these transplant flights are keenly aware of the urgent nature of these flights. Transplant flights are routinely flown in the late hours of the evening and can often have a crew on duty for up to 14hours. The use of the private aircraft allows hospitals around the country to match recipients with donors, regardless of their location. One of these individuals may be your neighbor, your friend, or even your family.

Private Aviation Gives Life

Many organ donor flights are flown by a local Aircraft Charter Company. The primary supplier of organ donor flights in the state of Utah is Keystone Aviation. Keystone Aviation offers the use of its fleet (based on availability) to local transplant organizations. Within the last year, Keystone Aviation successfully completed numerous organ donor flights, including a flight to and from Honolulu, Hawaii to aid in the procurement of a life-saving organ for a Utah resident. The highly trained and skilled flight crews at Keystone Aviation are placed on what the flight department has called “organ donor standby duty.” These crews are able to be airborne within two hours of being notified of the flight. Every member of the team at Keystone Aviation works diligently until the organ and transplant team has arrived at its destination.

 

  • 110,586 people are waiting for an organ
  • 18 people will die in the USA each day waiting for an organ
  • 1 organ donor can save up to 8 lives

The need for life-saving organs is great, and private aviation is here to assist. Together, private aviation and organ donors around the country are giving individuals in need a second chance at life.  For more information on this article or organ donation, visit www.organdonor.gov.

Aaron Mangone © has worked in the Aviation Industry since 2001 in positions that include Flight Coordinator, Pilot, and Charter Sales Manager. He Currently serves as the Charter Sales Manager at Keystone Aviation in Salt Lake City.

DISCLAIMER: Statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, editors and publishers. While care has been taken in the compilation of this article to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Keystone Aviation will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within this article.

Infographic: What Everybody Ought To Know About Baggage Fees

CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE

DISCLAIMER:  Statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, editors and publishers. While care has been taken in the compilation of this article to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Keystone Aviation will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within this article.

Keystone Aviation’s Guide to the World’s Best Airports

There are approximately 44,000 airports around the world serving millions of travelers each day. While many are built with eye-candy architecture, only a few truly stand out and make waiting for your flight a slightly more bearable experience. This guide to the world’s best airports is based on the 2010 Skytrax World Airport Awards, based on millions of completed survey interviews. It’s interesting to note that no U.S. airports made the top 10 list last year.

10. Bangkok Suvarnabhumi Airport, Bangkok, Thailand

A newcomer in the top 10, Suvarnabhumi Airport is an international airport in Bangkok, Thailand which opened September of 2006. Its name “Suvarnabhumi” was chosen by King Bhumibol Adulyadej which means “the golden kingdom”. In 2009, the airport catered to 40.5 million passengers making it the fifth busiest airport in Asia.

Fun fact:  Suvarnabhumi Airport currently has the world’s tallest control tower standing at 434 feet.

Guide to the World's Best Airports

9. Auckland International Airport, Mangere, New Zealand

Locally known as Mangere Airport, the Auckland International Airport ranked as the ninth best airport, a step higher from 2009’s results. Over 13 million passengers frequent the airport each year for both domestic and international flights. This number is expected to double by 2025.

Fun fact:  The airport has a capacity of approximately 45 flight movements per hour.

8. Beijing Capital International Airport, Beijing, China

Another entry from Asia, the Beijing Capital International Airport leaped from the 17th spot in 2009 to 8th in 2010. The airport was originally constructed in 1958 with one small terminal building which continues to stand today. Its most recent renovation in 2008 added Terminal 3 which is the second largest airport terminal in the world.

Fun fact: Beijing Capital’s Terminal 3 is also the third largest building in the world by area.

Guide to the World's Best Airports

7. Amsterdam Schiphol Airport, Haarlemmermeer, Netherlands

Seventh on the list is Netherlands’ Schiphol Airport. Officially known as Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, this international airport is Europe’s fourth largest airport in terms of total passenger traffic with 45.3 million passengers in 2010. Schiphol has large shopping areas and even has its own mortuary.

Fun fact: Schiphol has also hosted weddings since 2006.

Guide to the World's Best Airports

6. Zurich Airport, Zurich, Switzerland

Zurich Airport came in sixth on the list for 2010, dropping 2 spots from the prior year.  A total of 22.1 million passengers travelled through this airport in 2008.

Fun fact: Zurich Airport has been consistently included in best airport lists and has been a recipient of numerous awards in recent years.

5. Kuala Lumpur International Airport, Sepang, Selangor, West Malaysia

Kuala Lumpur International Airport is one of Southeast Asia’s largest airports capable of handling 35 million passengers each year.  The airport site itself spans 100 square kilometers, making it one of the largest sites in the world as well.

Fun fact: Kuala Lumpur International Airport cost RM8.5 billion or US$3.5 billion to build .

Guide to the World's Best Airports

4. Munich Airport, Munich, Germany

Earning the fourth spot on the list is Munich Airport, formally known as Munich Franz Josef Strauss Airport. In1995,the airport served approximately 15 million passengers a year.  Thisnumber grew to more than 30 million in 2006. Despite these figures, Munich airport is only the second busiest airport in Germany in terms of passenger traffic;Frankfurt Airport is the busiest.

Fun fact: The airport has a “Visitors Park” for sight-seers.

Guide to the World's Best Airports

3. Hong Kong International Airport, Chek Lap Kok, Hong Kong

Sliding down a spot, but still in the top 3, Hong Kong International Airport opened in 1998, succeeding the closed Kai Tak airport. In its 12 years of operation, the airport has won seven Skytrax World Airport Awards for customer satisfaction.

Fun fact: In 2009, Hong Kong International Airport became the second busiest airport in the world in terms of cargo traffic, handling 3,384,765 tons of cargo.

Guide to the World's Best Airports

2. Incheon International Airport, Incheon, South Korea

Awarded as the world’s best airport in 2009, Incheon International Airport (IIA) is the largest airport in South Korea. IIA has also received numerous awards including Airports Council International’s best airport in the world, winning consecutively since 2005 and has received a full 5-star rating from Skytrax. Amenities include a golf course, spa, private sleeping rooms, a casino, indoor gardens and a Museum of Korean Culture.

Fun fact: Only IIA, Hong Kong International Airport, and Singapore Changi Airport enjoy a 5-star rating from Skytrax.

1. Singapore Changi Airport, Changi, Singapore

Earning the title as world’s best airport for 2010, Changi Airport handled over 42 million passengers for the year making it the 5th busiest airport in Asia and 21st in the world in terms of passenger traffic. The airport currently serves 96 airlines with flights to 60 countries and territories worldwide.

Fun fact: Changi Airport has been known as one of the world’s best since its opening in 1981 and in 2009 alone, the airport has received 27 “Best” awards.

Guide to the World's Best Airports

All images courtesy of Wikipedia.

DISCLAIMER:  Statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors, editors and publishers. While care has been taken in the compilation of this article to present up-to-date and accurate information, we cannot guarantee that inaccuracies will not occur. Keystone Aviation will not be held responsible for any claim, loss, damage or inconvenience caused as a result of any information within this article.